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355 11th Street

The post-and-beam structure of a turn-of-the-century industrial building serves as a framework for a new building envelope and interior, providing new space for working and eating in San Francisco’s SOMA district. Solar power, natural ventilation and a unique double-skin façade contribute to the sustainability of this LEED Gold candidate project.

Background & Program

Slated to become San Francisco’s first Gold-level LEED-NC building, this 14,000 sqft mixed-use project was developed and constructed by the building’s primary occupant, a general contractor specializing in Green construction. The owner & general contractor occupies the entire second floor (administration & offices). The third floor is leased to design professionals. A restaurant & bar will occupy the first floor and exterior courtyard.

Design

Originally a warehouse, the Historic structure’s new role as a multi-tenant workspace invoked a new set of constraints for the building envelope:

A collection of metal and glass apertures, sensitively inserted into the original structural frame, provide the requisite functions of entry, exit, light and view necessary for the building’s new mixed-use program. The largest of these apertures unfolds within the interior to become a bridge traversing the two-story lobby, finally terminating as a reception desk for the second floor offices.

On the east and west facades, the new metal skin is perforated with fields of small holes that allow light and air to pass through new operable windows hidden beyond. The perforated outer skin mitigates solar heat gain while enabling cross-ventilation of the interior. This rudimentary double-skin façade becomes a screen for sunlight and air, allowing the stoic, industrial character of the original building to be maintained without the visual introduction of new fenestration.

Clearly registering the rhythm of the Historic post-and-beam structure, the original fenestration of the building’s north façade was preserved and refurbished. The existing timber and concrete frame was carefully sandblasted to reveal the warmth and texture of the original materials. As day turns to evening, the perforations in the building’s new skin gradually reveal the historic character of the timber frame within.

The new fence surrounding the dining patio on Eleventh Street is a patterned bar-relief of wood panels, recessed light pockets, and view slots. The sectional profile of each light pocket reflects light from a single, hidden fixture toward both sides of the fence, thus maximizing the efficiency – and phenomenal effect – of each bulb. The dark color of the fence serves as a muted backdrop for the vivid hues of the surrounding plantings.

Narrative for “Saving By Design” Awards

Background

355 Eleventh is a LEED Gold candidate adaptive reuse of a Historic (and previously derelict) turn-of-the-century industrial building. It is the first project to rise through San Francisco’s new priority permitting process for green buildings, in which projects seeking Gold-level LEED certification are given front-of-the-line privileges for building permit application review. As a result, 355 Eleventh is on track to become the City’s first Gold-level LEED-NC building.

Sustainable Design Strategies

Natural Ventilation / Passive Cooling

New operable windows and skylights enable cross-ventilation and exhausting of warmer air. Interior partitions include operable clerestory windows to ensure airflow through each space.

Renewable Energy

30kW photovoltaic array produces over 70% of the building’s annual electricity load.

Adaptive Reuse

By carefully designing the new spaces, over 75% of the building’s original structure has been maintained.

Perforated Façade

Originally a warehouse, the Historic structure’s new role as a multi-tenant workspace invoked a challenging set of design constraints for the new building envelope:

Ample light and air was required for the building’s new office use, however San Francisco’s Planning Department placed strict limitations on the introduction of new fenestration due of the building’s Historic status (National Register of Historic Places). Additionally, the structure’s original corrugated siding was required to be replaced “in-kind” in order to preserve the industrial character of the building.

The architectural solution to these conflicting requirements was to perforate the building’s new corrugated skin with fields of small holes, allowing light and air to pass through new operable windows hidden behind. The perforated outer skin mitigates solar heat gain while enabling cross-ventilation of the interior. This rudimentary double-skin façade becomes a screen for sunlight and air, allowing the stoic, industrial character of the original building to be maintained without the visual introduction of new fenestration.

Energy Savings

Because the building is naturally ventilated and passively cooled, current energy codes (Title-24 and ASHRAE 90.1) require that the energy model include a fictitious allowance for hypothetical cooling and fan energy. As such, the attached permit compliance documentation does not show the true extent of the energy savings achieved by the naturally ventilated, passively cooled building.

Based on the Title-24 metric that includes fictitious cooling, the building complies by a margin of 9.3%. Eliminating the fictitious cooling energy from the Title-24 metric results in a true compliance margin of 25.1%.

Excluding fictitious fans and cooling, the building’s actual annual energy use will be 48,720-kWh of electricity per year. As such, the 38,580-kWh of electricity provided by the 30kW PV system will provide 79% of the annual electricity use.

Such a dramatic reduction is the culmination of a design process focused on the simple goals of reducing the need for energy consumption and maximizing the use and application of renewable energy sources.

Award Credit

Owner
Matarozzi/Pelsinger Builders
Daniel Matarozzi
Daniel Pelsinger
355 11th Street, Suite 200
San Francisco, CA 94103
415-285-6930
Design Architect
Aidlin Darling Design
Joshua Aidlin, AIA - Principal
David Darling, AIA - Principal
Shane Curnyn - Project Architect
500 Third Street, Suite 410
San Francisco CA 94107
415-974-5603
Structural Engineer
Berkeley Structural Design
Bill Lynch
1411 Glendale Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94708
510-981-1016
Mechanical Engineer
CB Engineers
Chikezie Nzewie
449 10th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
415-437-7330
Civil Engineer
Sandis Engineers
Bruce Davis
Mike Kuykendall
1721 Broadway, Suite 201
Oakland, CA 94612
510-873-8866
Geotechnical Engineer
Herzog Geotechnical Consulting Engineers
Craig Herzog
70 Woodside Lane
Mill Valley, CA 94941
415-388-8355
Landscape Architect
Miller Company
Jeff Miller
Kyla Burson
1585 Folsom Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
415-252-7288
General Contractor
Matarozzi/Pelsinger Builders
Daniel Pelsinger & Daniel Matarozzi - Principal
Peter Kellner - Project Manager
Mark Crawford - Construction Superintendent
355 11th Street, Suite 200
San Francisco, CA 94103
415-285-6930
Green Consultant
Simon & Associates, Bill Worthen
Streetscape Designer
Shift Design Studio, Jane Martin
Photography
Matthew Millman
Richard Barnes

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